Move More, Ruminate Less

The last time I referred to myself as “a runner” I lived in an almost-arctic Steel City and I was angry at everybody. I ran in the cold and in the rain and after snowpocalypse when the streets were empty and the snow still white. My legs were firm. I was always surprised when I saw them in the shower. They looked like they belonged to someone else.

Quite a few years have gone by since then. I live under the sun in the center of Spain now. The most intense training I do on a regular basis is carry groceries up to my apartment (which, to be fair, is a fifth-floor walk-up, aka: no joke).

My winter vacation was strange. It rolled along without melancholy until one day I woke up ruminating on all the things I don’t have enough of: money, time, close friends to call for coffee. I lost my appetite, dreaded the mornings, wrote mostly of dreams, felt useless, and wished I was working. People call this “the winter blues.” I called it if I see one more bulging bag of gifts, I’m going to lose it. The only thing that might possibly have satisfied my homesickness (aside from going home) would  have been a dance with a Philadelphia Mummer. Any Mummer would have done. Wishing a Dunkin Donuts barista Happy Holidays! may also have have sufficed.

Those feelings spilled over into the new year and finally into a work week that dragged on and on, into mornings I greeted begrudgingly and nights I wondered why the hell it was I’d decided to move again? Eat your fruit & veggies, drink watertry to go to sleep earlycall somebody, go outside. Those things help. This morning I woke up late, fed and dressed myself, put on red lips and headphones and headed to Dunkin Donuts. To-go coffee has always been my remedy for homesickness in Spain. It feels wasteful and silly–and it is. But drinking from a cardboard cup once a year is worth the relief, however momentary it may be, that mediocre coffee and its memories of home provides. Cup in hand, walking through my new city, my favorite neighborhoods, I thought of running. Of solitude. Of those days when I didn’t mind the weather, when I ran to release, when I learned that my body existed for reasons other than being hated.

I have to train againI have to remember what that’s like.

This time around I’ll learn different lessons but run for the same reason: to remember how much exists outside of me, to live in words other than should, could, and would.

Some Nights Are Like This

The radiator clicks. Hot water runs through the pipes. I’m used to sleeping in cold rooms. This room isn’t freezing though–not usually, not for me. I’ve been colder is what I mean to say. But tonight I have a visitor who has blood much warmer than mine, so I’ve turned the heating on.

At 4 o’clock in the morning I’m peeling blankets off my body. My head hurts, my teeth are sticky, and vomit feels imminent. I know my number will be high, though part of me would rather not. It’s four-hundred and thirty-two.

Was it the mandarin oranges? Did I forget to bolus? I didn’t.
Was it the walk, or lack thereof?
The position of the moon, the way the waiter looked at me, a gypsy curse from the Puerta del Sol?

These questions and a line from a Lucia Berlin story are my 4 a.m. companions. “Fear, poverty, alcoholism, loneliness are terminal illnesses. Emergencies, in fact.”

I creak my way into the bathroom where the floor is cold. New pump site, just in case. The needle stings this time. I draw breath, squint my eyes shut, raise a middle finger high. This is so old. I’m so over this. (–> Insert un-publishable litany of swear words. <–)  I don’t feel like being kind to myself. I feel like being asleep. I’m graceless and exhausted and infuriated by the fact that this disease is always different, often unpredictable, never-ending. I’m mad that I won’t get these moments back. I’m worried about what monsters they might create, those pathologies I’ve known by heart for far too long.

Tomorrow I’ll be grateful and accepting again. Tonight I’m standing on the cold floor, in front of the bathroom mirror, flipping my body off. Some nights are like this.