WHAT DO PEOPLE EAT?

Every day, every single day, I ask myself that question: At breakfast while I run down the escalator, biscuit dust flying from my mouth. At lunch, when I spend money I don’t have on a sandwich I don’t need at the cafe across the street. I repeat the question at dinner when I stand in front of the stove making an omelet (again) and then on weekends when I wonder about the nutritional value of guacamole for dinner. I laugh about it on Sunday morning, when a friend informs me that omelets are a no-go for breakfast (they are “demasiado Americano”). He walks down, then up, my one-million stairs to buy bread for tostadas. Spaniards don’t do breakfast omelets. Duly noted.

Confession: I’ve spent the past few days googling variations of “What did Oliver Sacks eat every day?” (sardines), “What did Steve Jobs eat every day?” (apples and carrots exclusively, sometimes for weeks), and “How do I expend zero mental energy on deciding what to feed myself?” Sometimes I  go to the grocery store and spend twenty minutes staring at the canned goods aisle. My mother would probably say buy grains and lentils! And I’d say and then what? I want simplicity. I want four to sixteen cups of coffee a day, a library in my bedroom, and hair that I don’t have to wash. I want bagels to be as healthy and as easy to bolus for as salads are.

Diabetes responds well to routine, stability, and balance–especially when it comes to food. I, however, am a woman who knows no middle ground. I am either fiercely focused or I’m thinking about and doing eighty-two things at once. Feeding myself suffers from this wild disposition. Apart from sharing good food with people I love (the communal aspect of eating is one I can get down with, one-hundred and ten percent), preparing food just feels like a distraction from something else I’d rather be doing (you know, like writing this blog, researching, or dancing to Bey). I suppose that’s how Oliver and Steve felt, blessed be their genius’, and why they adopted such extreme diets.

So seriously, what do people eat? I love a good sardine. Apples and carrots are great, too, but I will not face a room full of adolescents running solely on VC and beta-carotene.  I’m thinking about using this corner of the interweb to document my forays into feeding myself so, if anyone reads this, please do advise: what’s your one go-to meal? Make it low-carb, cheap, nutritious and easy to prepare and I’m all over it. I (in case you haven’t guessed by now) am sixty percent omelet.

Until next time, CHEERZ!

img_20170303_150855_239

Advertisements